Patients


We will help you live your life better

Are you ventilated with a tracheostomy or a facemask?

Do you suffer from recurrent lung infections? Shortness of breath?


 

 

We have another way. It’s called BCV.
No tracheostomy, No facemask.



In fact, our products are completely non-invasive.

With BCV you can eat, drink, and talk while receiving the respiratory support that you need. BCV is in most cases is just as effective, with absolutely no known side effects!

BCV provides complete ventilation in the most natural way possible. It helps to eliminate secretions and can help you avoid infections.

We can help remove the limitations imposed on you or a loved one by traditional therapy or ventilation methods.




Questions?

Call us at any time. We are here for you.

Want to learn more about BCV? Click here!

Don’t worry; we’ve got you covered. All of our products are accepted by a wide range of health insurance companies and government programs throughout the world!


Make the most of every breath!

Biphasic Cuirass Ventilation can be used in a variety of ways.



BCV is successfully used on patients with (Click Below):

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that includes two main illnesses: chronic bronchitis and emphysema. There is no cure for COPD. If you have chronic bronchitis, the lining in your bronchial tubes gets red and full of mucus. This mucus blocks your tubes, and makes it hard to breathe. If you have emphysema, your alveoli are irritated. They get stiff and can’t hold enough air. This makes it hard for you to get oxygen into and carbon dioxide out of your blood. BCV can be effectively used in COPD patients for assisting with ventilation or providing full ventilation, thus replacing intubation and conventional mechanical ventilation, whilst relieving muscle fatigue.
Children with type 1 have a weakness of the intercostal muscles (the muscles between the ribs) that help expand the chest, and the chest is often smaller than usual. The strongest breathing muscle in an SMA patient is the diaphragm. As a result, the patient appears to breath with their stomach muscles. The chest may appear concave (sunken in) due to the diaphragmatic (tummy) breathing. Also due to this type of breathing, the lungs may not fully develop, the cough is very weak, and it may be difficult to take deep enough breaths while sleeping to maintain normal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. Children with Type II also have weak intercostals muscles and are diaphragmatic breathers. They have difficulty coughing and may have difficulty taking deep enough breaths while they sleep to maintain normal oxygen levels and carbon dioxide levels. Scoliosis is almost uniformly present as these children grow, resulting in need for spinal surgery or bracing at some point in their clinical course. The goal of BCV in SMA patients is to offload the work of breathing full time, nocturnally and/or at naps to prevent hypoventilation that subsequently leads to more pathological changes such as hypercapnia, hypoxemia, atelectasis and V/Q mismatch to name just a few. Secretion Clearance is often indicated for secretion management and assisted coughing in some patients The use of BCV will improve quality of life and prevent reoccurring admissions to health care facilities.
When the muscles involved in breathing become very weak, lung function becomes inadequate so that there is not enough oxygen and too much carbon dioxide in the blood. This causes drowsiness, headaches and a general lack of well-being. When this happens, assistance with breathing through a face mask, used during sleep, may return the blood oxygen and carbon dioxide levels to normal and relieve the symptoms. A small number of affected people choose to have mechanically assisted breathing for 24 hours a day when their breathing muscles are so weak that they could not otherwise support life. The goal of BCV in DMD patients is to offload the work of breathing full time, nocturnally and/or at naps to prevent hypoventilation that subsequently leads to more pathological changes such as hypercapnia, hypoxemia, atelectasis and V/Q mismatch to name just a few. Secretion Clearance is often indicated for secretion management and assisted coughing in some patients. The use of BCV will improve quality of life and prevent reoccurring admissions to health care facilities.
Guillain-Barre is a disorder involving progressive muscle weakness or paralysis, usually after an infection – particularly a respiratory or gastrointestinal one. It is caused by inflammation of nerves and results in damage to the cover (myelin sheath) of the nerve. This damage causes the nerves to stop working effectively by slowing the messages carried to muscle and skin through the nerve. The symptoms of the disorder usually appear after the infection has gone and progress rapidly. These symptoms may include muscle weakness, paralysis, or spasms; numbness or tenderness; and blurred vision. Possible complications include: Persistent paralysis Respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation Hypotension or hypertension. Most patients require hospitalization and about 30% require ventilatory assistance. BCV can be effectively used in Guillain-Barre patients for assisting with ventilation or providing full ventilation, thus replacing intubation and conventional mechanical ventilation, whilst relieving muscle fatigue.
If you have Asthma the inside walls of your airways can become inflamed. The inflammation makes the airways very sensitive, and they tend to react strongly to things that you are allergic to or find irritating. When the airways react, they get narrower, and less air flows through to your lung tissue. This causes symptoms like wheezing (a whistling sound when you breathe), coughing, chest tightness, and trouble breathing. During an asthma attack, muscles around the airways tighten up, making the airways narrower so less air flows through. Inflammation increases, and the airways become more swollen and even narrower Cells in the airways may also make more mucus than usual. This extra mucus also narrows the airways. These changes make it harder to breathe. BCV works by recruitment of alveoli and improvement in ventilation/perfusion matching. Negative exrathoracic pressure of any sort provides a distending pressure on both airways and alveoli by increasing the transpulmonary pressure gradient. It may differ from positive airway pressure by avoiding compression of the pulmonary vascular bed. In the infant, it may also stabilize the easily collapsible chest wall, overcoming small airway closure and reducing air trapping. BCV will improve airway conductance or lung compliance. This is associated with a decrease WOB (work of breathing ) and makes the patient more comfortable. BCV has been proven to increase muscle strength and endurance, decrease hypercapnia, improve functional reserve of the respiratory muscles and decrease inspiratory muscle fatigue.
In a healthy person, there is a constant flow of mucus over the surfaces of the air passages in the lungs. This removes debris and bacteria. In someone with CF, this mucus is excessively sticky and cannot perform this role properly. In fact, the sticky mucus provides an ideal environment for bacterial growth. People with CF are at risk of bacterial chest infections. About half of people with CF have repeated chest infections and pneumonia. If they are not treated early and properly, these are very difficult to treat. Symptoms include persistent coughing, excess production of sputum (saliva and mucus), wheezing, and shortness of breath with ordinary activities People with CF need daily chest physiotherapy, which involves vigorous massage to help loosen the sticky mucus. Parents of a child with CF are taught by hospital staff how to do this. Older children and adults with CF can be taught to do this for themselves. Chest physiotherapy is important because it helps to prevent the thick, sticky lung secretions from blocking the air tubes This helps to reduce infection and prevent lung damage. The length of treatment sessions varies according to need. If there are few or no secretions, treatment sessions may only need to last 10-15 minutes. However, it could take as long as 45-60 minutes if there are many secretions to be cleared. The number of treatment sessions should be varied Most people do two a day when all is well, increasing to four a day when necessary. If no secretions are present, some people with CF only need treatment once a day.

With United Hayek products, there are easy-to-use airway clearance devices that can be utilized in both pediatric and adults patients. Unlike other Chest Percussion Devices, Hayek products do not require special positioning and breathing techniques. Our products can be used in the home-care setting, as well as the hospital. Treatment can be administered either by clinical or non-clinical personnel. Our products utilize BCV to generate a true High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) via the cuirass shell. BCV is a method of ventilation that works using a non-invasive cuirass or shell, attached to a power unit that actively controls both phases of the respiratory cycle (the inspiratory and expiratory phases).

Using frequencies of 240-1200 Cycles Per Minute, positive and negative pressures are applied to effectively expand and truly oscillate the chest wall and lungs to facilitate mobilization of secretions via the Vibration mode

Our products are the only airway clearance systems that have an active cough assistance mode.

Chronic respiratory failure (CRF) is associated with nocturnal hypoventilation. Due to the interaction of sleep and breathing, sleep quality is reduced during nocturnal hypoventilation. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NMV), usually performed overnight, relieves symptoms of hypoventilation and improves daytime parespiratory status in patients with CRF. This type of ventilatory support is now used commonly to assist ventilation in patients with a variety of neuromuscular and chest wall diseases. These may be separated into spinal cord lesions, diseases of peripheral nerves, disorders of the neuromuscular junction, diseases of muscles, and chest wall disorders. BCV is a proven option that relieves symptoms of CRF and can reduce episodes of nocturnal hypoventilation. BCV provides a more physiologic approach while not requiring an artificial airway. BCV allows patient comfort and decreases risks from invasive positive pressure ventilation.
Head and Spinal injuries are the result of a traumatic event, such as an automobile accident. Sport injuries are another major cause. The effects of these injuries can range from temporary to permanent disability. Many head and spinal injury patients will need assistance with ventilation that may be impaired post injury as well as clearance of the airways. BCV is proven to assist these patients with ventilation needs.
Some of the most common opportunistic infectious lung diseases seen in HIV-positive or AIDS patients are pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, tuberculosis, mycobacterium avium complex, fungal infections and viral and bacterial pneumonia. As improved treatment has reduced the risk of premature death from these diseases, other chronic complications such as pulmonary hypertension also have emerged. BCV is utilized to correct hypoxemia, hypoventilation and secretion retention. CNEP, Control Ventilation with synchrony, if required, and High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation are modalities that prevent intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation or can be used to wean off of invasive ventilation.
Respiratory failure is a syndrome in which the respiratory system fails in one or both of its gas exchange functions: oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination. In practice, it may be classified as either hypoxemic or hypercapnic.

Hypoxemic respiratory failure (type I) is characterized by an arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) lower than 60 mm Hg with a normal or low arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2). This is the most common form of respiratory failure, and it can be associated with virtually all acute diseases of the lung, which generally involve fluid filling or collapse of alveolar units. Some examples of type I respiratory failure are cardiogenic or noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, pneumonia, and pulmonary hemorrhage.

Hypercapnic respiratory failure (type II) is characterized by a PaCO2 higher than 50 mm Hg. Hypoxemia is common in patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who are breathing room air. The pH depends on the level of bicarbonate, which, in turn, is dependent on the duration of hypercapnia Common etiologies include drug overdose, neuromuscular disease, chest wall abnormalities, and severe airway disorders.

In respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation is used for 2 essential reasons: (1) to increase Pa O2 and (2) to lower Pa CO2. Mechanical ventilation also rests the respiratory muscles and is an appropriate therapy for respiratory muscle fatigue. BCV is a proven option that allows these goals to be obtained through a more physiologic approach while not requiring an artificial airway. BCV allows patient comfort and decreases risks from invasive positive pressure ventilation.

Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect which is classically understood to involve four anatomical abnormalities of the heart It is the most common cyanotic heart defect, and the most common cause of blue baby syndrome. In addition to persistent hypoxemia, tetralogy of Fallot may present with other anatomical anomalies, including stenosis of the left pulmonary artery, a bicuspid pulmonary valve, right-sided aortic arch, and coronary artery anomalies, to name a few. The goal of BCV is to support the cardiopulmonary system prior to and post surgical intervention. Continuous Negative Extrathoracic Pressure (CNEP) is a primary intervention that helps recruit smaller airways and allow optimization of ventilation and perfusion to improve hypoxemia. Ventilation and Secretion Clearance modes may be necessary for correcting hypoventilation and retained pulmonary secretions.
Atelectasis is a condition in which one or more areas of the lungs collapse or don’t inflate properly. If only a small area or a few small areas of lung are affected, there may be no signs or symptoms. If a large area or several large areas of lung are affected, they may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the blood. This can cause symptoms and complications. BCV has proven outcomes with helping re-inflate areas of the lung with atelectasis. This is achieved with one or more modes that provides BCV utilizing continuous negative extrathoracic pressure (CNEP), Control Ventilation as well as Secretion Clearance.
…and many more.
 
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